workers
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“Statement by the Adidas Group on the Asia Floor Wage Alliance’s proposal“

“Statement by the Adidas Group on the Asia Floor Wage Alliance’s proposal“

Link: www.adidas-group.com

A statement on the Asia Floor Wage was issued by the Adidas Group following the launch of the region-wide campaign. The Adidas Group welcomed the region-wide initiative to improve the lives of workers in the apparel industry. Adidas’ long-term goal is to partner with suppliers who progressively raise employees' living standards through improved wage systems, benefits, welfare programs and other services which enhance quality of life. The Adidas Group plans to engage with AFWA to understand their proposals better and to openly debate and discuss the practicalities of translating living wage concepts into a meaningful improvement in the wage conditions of garment workers in Asia.

 
“How realistic is an Asia Floor Wage?”

“How realistic is an Asia Floor Wage?

Link: http://clothesource.blogspot.com
Source: A blog dedicated to comments on the big issues in apparel sourcing from the world's leading source of Sourcing Intelligence

This blog gives different perspectives on the Asia Floor Wage. The author said the Asia Floor Wage campaign seems to have started with three fundamental flaws. First, it over-exaggerated the wide range of supports and representations from various labor groups across Asia as in fact there was no mention of groups from China, Laos, and Vietnam that participated in the launch. Second, the campaign overestimated the importance of Asia for clothing production as this campaign may lead to shifting of factories to Eastern Europe, Central America, and Africa. The third flaw of this campaign is that the floor wage will raise Bangladesh’s current wage so high that that it will pose risks to many workers’ job security and will also increase India’s competitive advantage in that industry.

 
Report on the five top retailers’ purchasing practices and working conditions

Cashing in  giant retailers, purchasing practices, and working conditions in the garment industry

Author: CleanClothesCampaign
Date: February 2009
Link: www.cleanclothes.org
Download: Summary.pdf

The CleanClothesCampaign has prepared a detailed report on five top global retailers: Carrefour, Walmart, Tesco, Aldi, and Lidl, that sheds light on the poor working conditions that seem to prevail where these discounters produce their clothes.

 

 
Bangladesh: Retailers urge action on garment wages

Bangladesh: Retailers urge action on garment wages

Date: February 2010
Source: just-style.com

Eleven global retailers, including Walmart, Gap Inc, and H&M, are urging the Bangladeshi Prime Minister to take "swift action" over low wages for garment workers which they fear could taint their reputations as socially responsible companies.

 
High street retailers slated for fashion's poverty pay

High street retailers slated for fashion's poverty pay

Source: Just-Style
Author: Leonie Barrie
Date: October 8, 2009
Link: www.just-style.com

A scathing report criticizes leading British brands and high street retailers for failing to pay a living wage to the workers making their garments  and says that most have no plans in place to raise wages to acceptable levels in the near future.

 
Retailers at the forefront of living wage practices

Ugly low-pay truth of high street fashion

Author and source: Nicholas Smith, The Sunday Times
Date: January 31, 2010
Link: women.timesonline.co.uk

Low wages remain a fact of life for many garment workers, particularly in Sri Lanka. Indeed, suppliers of Marks & Spencer, Tesco, and Asda, realize the difficulty of applying a living wage. Thus, retailers are cooperating with the Ethical Trading Initiative (ETI) to narrow the gap between the workers’ code and actual pay.

 
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